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Oracle DBA Interview Questions

Most asked Oracle DBA Interview Questions.

60 Technical Questions
42 Backup & Recovery Questions

Unix For Oracle DBA 20 Questions

Oracle DBA Topics

Overview of Oracle Grid Architecture

Difference between cluster and grid

Responsibilities of DBA's

Creating Oracle Database

Creating Database using SQL

Creating DB in 12c using DBCA

Creating DB in 12c using SQL commands

Managing Oracle 12c Container Databases

Creating Users in Oracle 12c

Managing Pluggable Databases in Oracle 12c

Creating Pluggable Database

Cloning Pluggable Database

Unplug and Plug databases in CDB's

Managing Tablespaces and Datafiles

Extending tablespaces

Decreasing size of a tablespace

Coalescing Tablespaces

Taking tablespaces Offline or Online

Making a Tablespace Read only

Renaming Tablespaces

Dropping Tablespaces

Viewing Info about Tablespaces

Renaming Datafiles

Relocating Datafiles

Relocating Datafiles in Multiple Tablespaces

Temporary Tablespace

Changing the size

Tablespace Groups

Creating a Temp. Tablespace Group

Assigning a Tablespace Group

Diagnosing and Repairing LMT

Scenario 1: Fixing Bitmap

Scenario 2: Dropping a Corrupted Segment

Scenario 3: Fixing Bitmap when Overlapped

Scenario 4: Correcting Corruption of Blocks

Scenario 5: Migrating from a Dictionary-Managed to LMT

Transporting Tablespaces

Procedure for transporting tablespaces

Transporting Tablespace Example


Adding New Redo Logfile Group

Adding Members to group

Dropping Members from group

Dropping Logfile Group

Resizing Logfiles

Renaming or Relocating Logfiles


Viewing Info About Logfiles

Managing Control Files

Multiplexing Control File

Changing the Name of a Database

Creating A New Control File

Cloning an Oracle Database


Switching to Automatic Management

Calculate Undo Retention

Altering UNDO Tablespace

Dropping an Undo Tablespace

Switching Undo Tablespaces

Viewing Information

SQL Loader


From Fixed Length file

From MySQL to Oracle

Using WHEN condition

Conventional and Direct Path Load

Direct Path

Restrictions on Using Direct Path Loads

Export and Import

Invoking Export and Import

Parameters of Export tool

Exporting Full Database

Exporting Schemas

Exporting Tables

Exporting Consistent Image of tables

Using Import Utility

Example Importing Tables

Import from One User to another User

Using Pattern Matching

Migrating a Database across platforms


Data Pump Export

Exporting a Full Database

Exporting a Schema

Exporting Individual Tables

Filtering Objects during Export

Filter Rows during Export

Suspending and Resuming Export

Data Pump Import Utility

Importing Full Dump File

Importing Objects between Schemas

Loading Objects between Tablespaces

Generating SQL File of DDL commands

Import objects of a Schema

Importing Only Particular Tables

Interactive Mode

Flash Back Features

Flashback Query

Flashback Version Query

Flashback Table to Past States

Purging Objects from Recycle Bin

Flashback Objects With Same Name

Flashback instead of PIT Recovery

Enabling Flash Back Database

Sizing flash recovery area

How far we can flashback database

Example:Flashing Back Database

Flashback Data Archive (FDA)
(Oracle Total Recall)


Creating FDA tablespace

Creating FDA

Querying historical data

Log Miner

LogMiner Configuration

LogMiner Dictionary Options

Using the Online Catalog

Extracting Dictionary to Log Files

Extracting Dictionary to File

Redo Log File Options

Example: Finding All Modifications

Mining Logfiles in a Time Range


Opening DB in Archivelog Mode

Reverting back to NoArchiveLog mode

Taking Offline (COLD) Backups

Taking Online (HOT) Backups

Recovering from the Loss of a Datafile

When in Noarchivelog Mode

When in Archivelog Mode

Recovering from loss of Control File

Recovery Manager ( RMAN )

Offline Backups using RMAN

Recover DB when in NOARCHIVELOG

Online Backups using RMAN

Backup tablespaces or datafiles

Image Backups in RMAN

Incremental Backup using RMAN

Updating backup copy for fast recovery

View info about RMAN backups

Configuring Retention policy

Configure Options in RMAN

Maintaining RMAN Repository

Recover datafiles (Archivelog mode)

Recover datafiles by renaming

Performing Disaster Recovery










Introduction to Oracle Database 


An Oracle database is a collection of data treated as a unit. The purpose of a database is to store and retrieve related information. A database server is the key to solving the problems of information management. In general, a server reliably manages a large amount of data in a multiuser environment so that many users can concurrently access the same data. All this is accomplished while delivering high performance. A database server also prevents unauthorized access and provides efficient solutions for failure recovery.

Oracle Database is the first database designed for enterprise grid computing, the most flexible and cost effective way to manage information and applications. Enterprise grid computing creates large pools of industry-standard, modular storage and servers. With this architecture, each new system can be rapidly provisioned from the pool of components. There is no need for peak workloads, because capacity can be easily added or reallocated from the resource pools as needed.

The database has logical structures and physical structures. Because the physical and logical structures are separate, the physical storage of data can be managed without affecting the access to logical storage structures.

Overview of Oracle Grid Architecture

The Oracle grid architecture pools large numbers of servers, storage, and networks into a flexible, on-demand computing resource for enterprise computing needs. The grid computing infrastructure continually analyzes demand for resources and adjusts supply accordingly.

For example, you could run different applications on a grid of several linked database servers. When reports are due at the end of the month, the database administrator could automatically provision more servers to that application to handle the increased demand.

Grid computing uses sophisticated workload management that makes it possible for applications to share resources across many servers. Data processing capacity can be added or removed on demand, and resources within a location can be dynamically provisioned. Web services can quickly integrate applications to create new business processes.

Difference between a cluster and a grid

 Clustering is one technology used to create a grid infrastructure. Simple clusters have static resources for specific applications by specific owners. Grids, which can consist of multiple clusters, are dynamic resource pools shareable among many different applications and users. A grid does not assume that all servers in the grid are running the same set of applications. Applications can be scheduled and migrated across servers in the grid. Grids share resources from and among independent system owners.

At the highest level, the idea of grid computing is computing as a utility. In other words, you should not care where your data resides, or what computer processes your request. You should be able to request information or computation and have it delivered - as much as you want, and whenever you want. This is analogous to the way electric utilities work, in that you don't know where the generator is, or how the electric grid is wired, you just ask for electricity, and you get it. The goal is to make computing a utility, a commodity, and ubiquitous. Hence the name, The Grid. This view of utility computing is, of course, a "client side" view.

From the "server side", or behind the scenes, the grid is about resource allocation, information sharing, and high availability. Resource allocation ensures that all those that need or request resources are getting what they need, that resources are not standing idle while requests are going unserviced. Information sharing makes sure that the information users and applications need is available where and when it is needed. High availability features guarantee all the data and computation is always there, just like a utility company always provides electric power.

Responsibilities of Database Administrators

Each database requires at least one database administrator (DBA). An Oracle Database system can be large and can have many users. Therefore, database administration is sometimes not a one-person job, but a job for a group of DBAs who share responsibility.

A database administrator's responsibilities can include the following tasks:




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